Module also offered within study programmes:
General information:
Name:
Geology of the World
Course of study:
2017/2018
Code:
BGG-2-206-EG-s
Faculty of:
Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection
Study level:
Second-cycle studies
Specialty:
Economic Geology
Field of study:
Mining and Geology
Semester:
2
Profile of education:
Academic (A)
Lecture language:
English
Form and type of study:
Full-time studies
Course homepage:
 
Responsible teacher:
prof. dr hab. inż. Wendorff Marek (wendorff@agh.edu.pl)
Academic teachers:
prof. dr hab. inż. Wendorff Marek (wendorff@agh.edu.pl)
Module summary

The aims of this course are to know: (i) the processes of crustal evolution; (ii) the chief rock units of the continental blocks and thier origins; (iii) regional background of economic deposits

Description of learning outcomes for module
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Connections with FLO Method of learning outcomes verification (form of completion)
Skills
M_U001 Student has the ability to analyse the regional crustal features/units and their relations and evolution In time and space, and Has the ability to creatively expand his/her knowledge of broad-scale regional geology GG2A_W01, GG2A_U02, GG2A_U01, GG2A_K01 Essay,
Test,
Test results
Knowledge
M_W001 Student knows the mantle-crust interactions, principles of plate tectonics, geodynamics of the lithosphere, and the classification and origins of its component crustal provinces GG2A_W01 Examination,
Test
M_W002 Student knows the evolution of the Archaean crust: cratonic nuclei, greenstone belts: rock successions, intrusive relations and preservation of stratigraphy; models of evolution and cratonisation GG2A_W01, GG2A_W08 Examination,
Test
M_W003 Student knows Proterozoic crustal evolution - layered igneous complexes, orogenic belts and forelands, cratonisation; the Rodinia Supercontonent. Specific problems of the Precambrian stratigraphy and economic deposits GG2A_W01, GG2A_W08 Examination,
Test
M_W004 Student knows the crustal evolution in the Phanerozoic; Gondwana and Pangea assembly and break-up; the main stages of geotectonic evolution and related regional units GG2A_W01, GG2A_W08 Examination,
Test
FLO matrix in relation to forms of classes
MLO code Student after module completion has the knowledge/ knows how to/is able to Form of classes
Lecture
Audit. classes
Lab. classes
Project classes
Conv. seminar
Seminar classes
Pract. classes
Zaj. terenowe
Zaj. warsztatowe
Others
E-learning
Skills
M_U001 Student has the ability to analyse the regional crustal features/units and their relations and evolution In time and space, and Has the ability to creatively expand his/her knowledge of broad-scale regional geology - - - - - + - - - - -
Knowledge
M_W001 Student knows the mantle-crust interactions, principles of plate tectonics, geodynamics of the lithosphere, and the classification and origins of its component crustal provinces + - - - - + - - - - -
M_W002 Student knows the evolution of the Archaean crust: cratonic nuclei, greenstone belts: rock successions, intrusive relations and preservation of stratigraphy; models of evolution and cratonisation - - - - - + - - - - -
M_W003 Student knows Proterozoic crustal evolution - layered igneous complexes, orogenic belts and forelands, cratonisation; the Rodinia Supercontonent. Specific problems of the Precambrian stratigraphy and economic deposits - - - - - + - - - - -
M_W004 Student knows the crustal evolution in the Phanerozoic; Gondwana and Pangea assembly and break-up; the main stages of geotectonic evolution and related regional units - - - - - + - - - - -
Module content
Lectures:

Earth’s origin and structure. Principles of plate tectonics; crustal tectonic provinces, their features and evolution. Wilson Cycle. Global tectonics: growth of continents; cratonisation and orogenesis; continental assembly and dispersal; global stages of cratonisation through geological time.
Evolution of the early crust in the Archaean – cratonic nuclei; greenstone belts: rock successions, intrusive relations and preservation of stratigraphy; models of evolution and cratonisation. The Barberton Greenstone Belt. Granitoid-greenstone terrains of the Kaapvaal, Zimbabwe and Pilbara Cratons, and the Canadian Shield. The Isua Greenstone Belt and the earliest signs of life. Polymetamorphic terrains, orogenesis and craton deformations: the Limpopo Belt. The Witwatersrand Supergroup – foreland sedimentation and gold deposits.
Proterozoic crustal evolution. Layered igneous complexes: Bushveld Complex; Great Dyke. Assembly and breakup of the Rodinia Supercontinent. Grenvillean/Kibaran orogeny. Orogenic belts: Magondi, Namaqua-Natal belts, Pan-African-Brasiliano belts system, and their correlatives – tectonic evolution and basin reconstructions; igneous processes. Ore-bearing, syn-rift sedimentary complexes in the Katangan-Damara belt. Controversy of the global “Snowball Earth” glaciations.
Phanerozoic – the assembly of Gondwana; the Karoo Supergroup (and pan-Gondwana age equivalent units): plate tectonic controls on basin tectonics, climate and sedimentation in foreland and intracratonic basins; flood basalts. Assembly of the Pangaea Supercontinent (Gondwana+Euramerica+Siberia) and its break-up. Caledonides. Hercynian/Variscan-Alleghenian orogeny. The Laramide Orogeny. The Alpine orogens – geology of the component orogenic belts. Outline of geology of the Himalaya. The Andes: diachronous subduction; subduction of ridges, volcanic arcs, and flat slabs. Ongoing rifting of the African Craton.
Selected problems, for example: kimberlites – occurrences, economic aspects and plate tectonic constraints; Creatceous-to-Recent sedimentation in a continental-scale intracratonic basin: the Kalahari Beds.

Seminar classes:

Earth’s origin and structure. Principles of plate tectonics; crustal tectonic provinces, their features and evolution. Wilson Cycle. Global tectonics: growth of continents; cratonisation and orogenesis; continental assembly and dispersal; global stages of cratonisation through geological time.
Evolution of the early crust in the Archaean – cratonic nuclei; greenstone belts: rock successions, intrusive relations and preservation of stratigraphy; models of evolution and cratonisation. The Barberton Greenstone Belt. Granitoid-greenstone terrains of the Kaapvaal, Zimbabwe and Pilbara Cratons, and the Canadian Shield. The Isua Greenstone Belt and the earliest signs of life. Polymetamorphic terrains, orogenesis and craton deformations: the Limpopo Belt. The Witwatersrand Supergroup – foreland sedimentation and gold deposits.
Proterozoic crustal evolution. Layered igneous complexes: Bushveld Complex; Great Dyke. Assembly and breakup of the Rodinia Supercontinent. Grenvillean/Kibaran orogeny. Orogenic belts: Magondi, Namaqua-Natal belts, Pan-African-Brasiliano belts system, and their correlatives – tectonic evolution and basin reconstructions; igneous processes. Ore-bearing, syn-rift sedimentary complexes in the Katangan-Damara belt. Controversy of the global “Snowball Earth” glaciations.
Phanerozoic – the assembly of Gondwana; the Karoo Supergroup (and pan-Gondwana age equivalent units): plate tectonic controls on basin tectonics, climate and sedimentation in foreland and intracratonic basins; flood basalts. Assembly of the Pangaea Supercontinent (Gondwana+Euramerica+Siberia) and its break-up. Caledonides. Hercynian/Variscan-Alleghenian orogeny. The Laramide Orogeny. The Alpine orogens – geology of the component orogenic belts. Outline of geology of the Himalaya. The Andes: diachronous subduction; subduction of ridges, volcanic arcs, and flat slabs. Ongoing rifting of the African Craton.
Selected problems, for example: kimberlites – occurrences, economic aspects and plate tectonic constraints; Creatceous-to-Recent sedimentation in a continental-scale intracratonic basin: the Kalahari Beds.

Student workload (ECTS credits balance)
Student activity form Student workload
Summary student workload 85 h
Module ECTS credits 3 ECTS
Participation in seminar classes 15 h
Preparation of a report, presentation, written work, etc. 20 h
Preparation for classes 20 h
Participation in lectures 30 h
Additional information
Method of calculating the final grade:

The final grade: = 0,5*examination result + 0,1 * test result + 0,4* essay and presentation result

Prerequisites and additional requirements:

• Student must have passed successfully all the courses that precede this one
• Basic knowledge of English (read, written and spoken)
• Ability to analyse and synthesise the provided geological material/data: texts, maps, diagrams etc.
• Basic software (MS Office package, Corel Draw)
• All presentations and written matters will be in English

Recommended literature and teaching resources:

1. Windley, B.F., 1995. The evolving continents. Wiley Science. p. 526.
2. Goodwin, A.M., 2000. Principles of Precambrian Geology. Academic Press, p. 327.
3. Bally, A., Roberts, D.G., 2010. Phanerozoic Regional Geology of the World. Elsevier Science & Technology, p. 675.
4. Kearey, P., Klepeis, K.A., Vine, F.J., 2009. Global Tectonics. John Wiley & Sons, p. 496
5. Mizerski, W., 2006. Geologia regionalna kontynentów. PWN, Warszawa, p. 305.
6. Golonka, J., 2000. Cambrian-Neogene Plate Tectonic Maps. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego

Scientific publications of module course instructors related to the topic of the module:

Wendorff, M., 2011. Tectonosedimentary expressions of the evolution of the Fungurume foreland basin in the Lufilian Arc, Neoproterozoic-Lower Palaeozoic, Central Africa. In: D. van Hinsbergen, S.J.H. Buiter, T.H. Torsvik, C.H. Gaina and S.J. Webb (Editors), Out of Africa: a synopsis of 3.8 Ga of Earth History. Geological Society of London, Special Publications, Vol. 357. The Geological Society, London, pp. 69-83.
Wendorff, M. and Key, R.M., 2009. The relevance of the sedimentary history of the Grand Conglomerat Formation (Central Africa) to the interpretation of the climate during a major Cryogenian glacial event. Precambrian Research, 172: 127-142.
Wendorff, M., Radwański, L. and Papiernik, B., 2013. Modelling of distribution and geometry of lithological complexes of the Ecca Group (the Karoo Supergroup) in SW Botswana. Geology, Geophysics and Environment, 39(1): 55-69.

Additional information:

None